A third of men with mental health issues blame work
Mental health

Work-related mental health problems are more common in men than women, according to new research by mental health charity Mind. But they’re far less likely to seek help, the study shows.

Thirty-two per cent of men attribute poor mental health to their jobs, with only 14% saying their problems are due to factors outside of work. This is a drastic contrast to the 19% of women who cite work as the cause of their problems.

Men are much less likely to seek help for their problem than women, say Mind. They’re also more likely to feel that their organisation doesn’t give them the space to speak openly about their concerns. While 43% of women have taken time off for mental health-related issues, only 29% of men report that they’ve taken time off for the same reason.

This lack of support experienced by men causes a flurry of related issues, such as self-medicating with alcohol and drugs, and shown to be more common in men, who are less likely than women to open-up about their issues and seek help. It’s also common for men to exercise rather than address their problems. While this might be a healthier solution, coming to terms with their mental health and talking about it is always advised by Mind.

On the back of this study, which comes from a survey of 15,000 employees from 30 different organisations, Mind are urging employers to sign up to the Workplace Wellbeing Index – which is a benchmark of best policy and practice concerning staff mental wellbeing.

See our interview with ITV presenter and Mind ambassador, Matt Johnson, about his battle with depression, in the latest issue of HFM. Get your copy in Holland & Barrett stores or online for just £1.99 – on sale 21 August 2017.

 

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